Friday, April 15, 2011

Copyeditors Needed Now strikes again!


Yet another thing I just love about living on Long Island: We have a serial killer, or perhaps even more than one.  It's not bad enough that this crazy island is home to people who drive like maniacs, people whose accents make my ears hurt, and freakin' Mets fans, but now there's a serial killer on the loose, too.

In related news, at the Copyeditors Needed Now offices, there's an idiot on the loose.  I get what that idiot was trying to say--that aerial imaging was being used in investigating the serial killings.  But that line of text could have been written better because as it stands now, it looks like aerial imaging was used in the actual serial killings--as if one of these poor victims died due to aerial imaging as opposed to dying from strangulation.

I get that headlines on the web have a character limit and that writers are pretty limited in what they can fit into the one line of text they're allotted for that headline, but I really feel like the writer could have done a little better thinking up some text that wasn't so misleading and silly-sounding...

2 comments:

Alisdair said...

You can see this sort of thing all over, media's short clips are notorious for it. I have trouble in my second language sometimes when I read shortened clips because they intentionally ignore some grammar rules. If I were fluent I may be able to understand better but sometimes I have to admit to myself that I have no idea what they are trying to say despite understanding the words used.

I saw this once at university were an advertisement read "Japan Trip." I had some issues with it, surely it's either a Japanese trip, or a trip to Japan. In Australian spoken language people also use phrases that use a noun in place of an adverb. For instance, "I was going real quick." It's hard for people to see that this is incorrect because it's how people talk all the time.

THE GRAMMARPHILE said...

Yep, I've noticed this sort of thing all the time too--and a lot of these things are accepted as colloquialisms. Sometimes when I'm reading something quickly I won't notice them, and will then go back later and notice that perhaps the grammar wasn't all that great...