Sunday, February 15, 2009

I feel like we're at the International House of Grammar and Spelling Errors...

PAT's been lucky enough to do some traveling, and he was kind enough to send over some of the amusing mistakes he found when he was in other countries. Like this one...



We have an agreement issue going on in that picture... But I'm actually less concerned about that than I am about the really, really long name of whatever-it-is that is being repaired! Man, if I had to spell crazy stuff like that every day, I might have to give up my spelling bee queen crown...that looks tough!

And PAT also found us this little piece of Engrish...


Ahhh, Itary. :) Is that where Itarian food comes from? Too cute!

Thanks, PAT, for finding these cute and worldly little errors!

8 comments:

Brian said...

Years ago I had a Korean girlfriend. “Changdukgung Yunkyungdang hanglangchei” means door.

Or beehive. I'm not really sure.

All I know is that whenever we were in the shower, (I insist on conserving water whenever possible,) she would scream something that sounded just like that. Except, hanglangchei sounded more like banglangchei.

I know they sound similar. But I can guarantee you do not want to get the two confused.

Only made that mistake once.

THE GRAMMARPHILE said...

LOL. At least you learn from your mistakes!

Emperor Xun Yiu Lochan said...

Actuarry Changdukgung Yunkyundang Hanglanchei translate to toilet in Engrish. This specific one my great ancestor Yao Yan Sun Shang Fat built with the help of his thirty wives! This mark greatest achievement of his dynasty!

Bridgete said...

"Everybody love the Korean historical properties" sounds a little like a command to do something dirty to them.

THE GRAMMARPHILE said...

@ Emperor: Wow, if that dude had 30 wives to deal with, how did he even find TIME to use the toilet? Crazy.

THE GRAMMARPHILE said...

@ Bridgete: Haha, yes, you're right--it does sound kinda dirty! :)

Prefers Her Fantasy Life said...

I used to live in Tokyo and found their English translations to be oddly poetic.

THE GRAMMARPHILE said...

I think their English translations are charming. Lucky you for getting to live among them for a while!